Category: Voiced for Radio

Maryland Is Home To The Healthiest Brains In The Country, Study Says

Maintaining a healthy brain usually means more than just burying your nose in a book. Experts say to preserve brain power as one ages one should eat well, stay physical, challenge oneself mentally and stay socially active. And as a recent study shows, Maryland may be the best place in the country to keep your brain in tip-top shape.

Maryland was ranked No. 1 of all 50 states and the District of Columbia, boosted by high scores in a number of factors, including low rates of smoking, low incidence of Alzheimer’s-related deaths, and a hearty appetite for seafood, fruits and vegetables.

The result comes as part of America’s Brain Health Index, a portion of a national health campaign called Beautiful Minds. It’s a joint effort between Dr. Michael Roizen of the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Majid Fotuhi of the NeurExpand Brain Center, and DSM Nutritional Products, a purveyor of vitamins and food additives like omega-3 fatty acids.

To read the full article, visit WAMU.org.

Should Virginia Chicken Owners Be Able To Kill Dogs That Attack Their Flock?


An eye for an eye, a snout for a beak. That’s the way things sometimes work in Virginia, where the law on the books not only allows citizens who own chickens to shoot dogs attacking their flock, but requires animal control officers to put down “confirmed poultry killers” on sight.

With backyard hens becoming more popular among urban locavores, Del. Jennifer McClellan (D-Richmond) wants to amend the law that she says was written mostly with rural populations in mind.

“That law makes sense in a rural setting where your poultry is part of your livelihood, but you can imagine if that were to happen in a densely-populated urban area, it might not be such a good idea,” McClellan says.

Far from being a hypothetical scenario, McClellan says she has seen the law play out near her home district.

“This was brought to a city councilman’s attention by a woman in Hanover who had her dog killed by her neighbor,” McClellan says. “The neighbor claimed the dog was chasing her chickens, so she killed the dog. The dog owner said she didn’t believe her, but there’s nothing she could do about it because of the code on the books.”

To see the full article, visit WAMU.org.

Shop Class Of The Future: Maryland High School Offers Course On Drones


A group of high school students in Anne Arundel County are taking a cutting-edge course in the construction and operation of unmanned aerial systems (UAS), also known as drones. Those involved with designing the program say they believe it’s the first high school-level program of its kind in the country.

The class was developed as part of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) magnet program at South River High School. Students learn both the engineering principles behind drone aircraft as well as the practical uses of the technology.

Students also get time to actually learn how to fly the aircraft. WBAL in Baltimore captured some footage of the students testing the craft near the school.

While it may look fun, this is no introductory course. It builds on previous courses taken by the upperclassmen in aerospace and civil engineering, and utilizes skills that span a number of fields like computer science and electronics.

To read the full article, go to WAMU.org.

Baltimore Pop-Up 3D Printing Store Lets You Turn Your Face Into A Gift


Looking for Christmas gift ideas, but can’t find anything personal enough? A new 3D scanning and printing store is opening in Baltimore Friday that will let you spread the holiday cheer by gifting jewelry, bobbleheads and ceramic coffee mugs featuring scale models of your face.

The Bmore3D Store in the Canton neighborhood of Baltimore was created as part of a collaboration between local 3D artists and designers. One of the stores biggest draws is ShapeShot — the first fully-automated 3D photo booth.

“People can walk in, sit down, and hit the big red button and it takes a 3D scan of their face,” says Todd Blatt, a 3D artist who helped organize the store. “From there, any products that you want your face on can be created. By default we have six of them, including stuff like a little mini-figurine with your head on it and a Christmas tree ornament.”

To read the full article, go to WAMU.org
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Historic Launch Puts Satellite Built By Fairfax Students Into Orbit


It was a historic day at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia Tuesday night, as a group of current and former students from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology celebrated the launch of TJ3Sat — the first satellite built by high school students ever to be launched into space.

Students seize on opportunities

TJ3Sat was just one of 28 small “cubesat” satellites, many built by universities across the country, sent into low Earth orbit Tuesday night. The excitement was palpable in the viewing area in the minutes before the Minotaur I rocket took flight, despite a 45-minute delay.

Few people anticipated the launch quite as much as Thomas Jefferson senior and TJ3Sat Student Leader Rohan Punnoose.

“This is probably one of the most amazing days of my life,” said Punnoose. “This is a life-changing experience.”

Punnoose is just one of the more than 50 students who worked on the TJ3Sat program over the course of seven years.

To read the full story, go to WAMU.org
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Washington Metro Area Ranks As Top Destination For Millennials

Whether you call them Millennials, Generation Y or just young people, those between the ages of 25 and 34 have been flocking to the Washington Metropolitan area in droves. This comes according to analysis of Census data published by the Wall Street Journal.

Between 2010 and 2012, D.C. saw an annual increase of 12,583 young people. It’s the highest rate in the country by far, well ahead of other popular destinations among the young like Denver, Portland and Houston.

It’s been quite the turnaround for the District, which was losing an average of more than 400 members of Generation Y in the recessionary years between 2007 and 2009.

The causes of D.C.’s meteoric rise are less clear, but the analysis suggests that economics plays a major factor. D.C. has the highest median household income among large metropolitan areas and one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country.

To read the full article, go to WAMU.org.

Buying A Home Cheaper Than Renting In D.C. Area, At Least For Now

Buying a home in the D.C. Metro area is 31 percent cheaper than renting according to a report by the real estate blog Trulia.

The number may seem high, but the nation’s capital is not alone — the data shows it is cheaper to buy than rent in each of the 100 largest metro areas in the country.

The study compares the estimated sale price and rents for similar homes in similar neighborhoods, including relevant secondary costs like maintenance, insurance, taxes, security deposits and more. It also assumes the prospective tenant is in the 25 percent tax bracket (making between $72,500 and $146,400 for married joint filers), has secured a 4.8 percent mortgage rate on a 30-year fixed-rated loan with 20 percent down, and will live in the house for at least seven years.

To read the full article, go to WAMU.org.

Virginia Ranks In Top 10 For Cost Of Car Ownership


When it comes to the cost of operating vehicles, Virginia drivers are paying more out of pocket every year than most of the rest of the country.

The Commonwealth ranks No. 9 on Bankrate.com’s list of annual car-ownership costs. According to the report, commuters lay out $3,622 every year on gasoline, insurance, taxes, and repairs.

Maryland, by contrast, clocked in at No. 29 on the list, with costs of $3,158 — just below the national average of $3,201. D.C. was not included in the rankings.

To read the full article, go to WAMU.org
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Which Professions Can Afford To Live In The D.C. Area?


New data from the Center for Housing Policy confirms what many in the D.C. Metro area already know: it’s difficult or impossible for people in many professions to afford housing.

Residents in the Washington Metropolitan statistical area must earn a salary of $47,640 in order to pay fair market rent for a one-bedroom apartment, or $56,480 for a two-bedroom, according to the report. This puts housing out of reach for those in many professions, including housekeepers, wait staff, and yes, even news reporters.

Prospects for home ownership are even more daunting. With prices on homes in the area continuing their trend of double digit growth year over year, a salary of more than $80,000 is needed to afford a median-priced home of just $302,000.

Read the full article at WAMU.org.

Real Estate Prices In D.C. Area Up 10 Percent Over Last Year


The median price for residential real estate in the D.C. area continues its upward trend. A report by RealEstate Business Intelligence found that the median sales price for the month of July was $425,000 — a 10.4 percent increase over the same period last year.

That represents the highest median sales price for residential property in the month of July since 2005, before the housing collapse.

Home buyers not only face upward price pressure, but the housing stock is down 13 percent over the same period last year, and the median number of days-on-market is down from 23 days to 12.

Read the full article at WAMU.org
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